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Case Study Vignettes

$19.95

Make challenges come alive in your classroom or training with these 12 real-world leadership case studies.

Details

KLC’s compelling and focused case vignettes are designed to create powerful learning. Vignettes give your leadership program participants a glimpse of a real-life leadership challenge. Vignettes fit on a single page and take no more than a minute to read. Centered on the decision-making dilemmas of a single protagonist, they are open-ended and accessible to a variety of learners.

Use a case vignette to provoke short, learning-packed discussions about a single leadership idea. The collection is organized to allow you to choose a case based on the principle or competency you want to teach. 

Whatever leadership idea is on your lesson plan, you’ll have a vignette to go with it.

Case study vignettes in this collection are:

  • “How Do You Take on an Unforeseen Issue?”
    Mayor David Dunfield deals with an emerging debate in Lawrence over stricter limits on public smoking.
  • “Dealing with the ‘Driveway Tax’ Controversy in Mission”
    Mayor Laura McConwell deals with public reaction to a new fee aimed at improving the community’s streets in her Kansas City suburb.
  • “Taking Care of Yourself and Leading Others: How Can It Be Done?”
    Physician Robert Moser works to ensure Greeley County can adequately staff its health services.
  • “How Do You Keep from Being a Barrier to Your Own Dreams of Progress?”
    Crys Wood wants to do her part to bring a new aquatic center to Derby.
  • “How Do You Position Yourself to Intervene in a Situation You Care About?”
    Downtown Topeka business owner Connie Cook must determine how to respond when she fears a downtown renovation proposal could negatively affect her business.
  • “How Do You Bring Different Cultures Together?”
    Pastor Lance Carrithers guides his Dodge City church’s efforts to minister to the community’s substantial Latino population.
  • “How Do You Energize Others When Losses are at Stake?”
    Nonprofit director John Harvey fosters his Wyandotte County group’s work with a historic neighborhood to renovate an important but long ignored historical landmark.
  • “How Do You Create a Trustworthy Process?”
    School board president Don Shimkus must decide how to proceed after he learns his small, rural school district will have a superintendent’s vacancy.
  • “How Do You Make Progress When Beliefs Conflict?”
    Nancy Harness, a Garden City commissioner, looks for ways to make progress when representatives of the city’s Muslim population ask officials to create a separate burial area in the municipal cemetery.
  • “How Do You Advance Your Purpose?”
    David Toland returns to his southeast Kansas hometown to lead a nonprofit seeking to improve health in Allen County.
  • “How Do You Deal with an Unfamiliar Issue?”
    Manhattan City Engineer Rob Ott unexpectedly discovers little has been done to advance a nearly decade-old master plan designed to make his community more friendly to bicycle transportation.
  • “How Do You Take a Tough Stand?”
    Lawrence City Commissioner Dennis “Boog” Highberger finds himself in the position of casting the deciding vote on a difficult matter – the enactment of an ordinance enacting a workplace smoking ban.

 Each vignette comes with a facilitation guide highlighting primary leadership ideas in the case and including open-ended questions you can use to catalyze conversation and learning. Your purchase of this collection gives you the right to make unlimited copies of each case for your students or group members.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR TAX EXEMPT ORGANIZATIONS

Email a copy of your tax exemption certificate to [email protected]. Thane will set up an account for you with your email. He will let you know this has happened with a confirmation email from our office with your new account password. When you go to checkout in the KLC Store, you will see a message “Returning Customer? Click here to log in.” Click to open, then fill in the two blanks (your email and password Thane sends). Then click ‘remember me.’